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Tag: Legacy (1-10 of 46)

Harry Carey Jr., character actor in classic Hollywood Westerns, dies

Harry Carey Jr., a character actor who made a name for himself as part of director John Ford’s classics The Searchers and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, passed away on Thursday of natural causes at a hospice center in Santa Barbara, Calif. He was 91 years old.

Born in 1921 to silent film stars Harry Carey Sr. (who spent the bulk of his career in Westerns as well) and Olive Carey, Harry Jr.’s career spanned five decades. Though he rarely took top billing in any of his pictures, his military background (he served in the Navy during World War II) and his horse-riding ability made him an ideal sidekick to friend and frequent co-star John Wayne. The pair appeared in over 10 films together, often with Ford at the helm.

Carey also appeared in films with his parents: One with his father (1948′s Red River) and two with his mother (1956′s The Searchers and 1961′s Two Rode Together).

Younger audiences will likely recognize Carey from his roles as Mr. Anderson in Gremlins, one of the saloon regulars in Back to the Future Part III, and as Marshal Fred White in Tombstone. Overall, Carey appeared in over 100 films and 100 TV episodes (including stops on Gunsmoke and Little House on the Prarie).

He is survived by his wife Marilyn Carey, whom he married in 1944, three children, three grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Meryl Streep presents Viola Davis with Women in Film award

They may have been Oscar rivals earlier this year, but there’s nothing but love between Meryl Streep and Viola Davis. Streep, who ended Davis’ awards run for The Help by winning the Best Actress Oscar for The Iron Lady, lauded her friend and colleague Tuesday at Women in Film’s annual Crystal + Lucy Awards.

She called Davis “a lion-hearted woman;” a gifted and determined actress who studied at Juilliard, won Tony Awards and captivated Hollywood with her eight-minute performance in Doubt. “She was a newcomer at 45,” Streep joked.

Davis returned the love as she accepted the award. “I have a confession,” she said, sharing how touched she was when Streep sent her a card after the film wrapped. Davis also kept a photo of the two of them together on set. “Okay Meryl, I framed the card,” Davis said. “So you can never come over to the house.”

Other honorees at the private ceremony at the Beverly Hilton Hotel were actresses Christina Applegate and Chloe Grace Moretz, NBCUniversal Cable chief Bonnie Hammer, cinematographer Anette Haellmigk, and five female executives from Fox.

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Mike Wallace, '60 Minutes' interviewer, dies at 93

CBS newsman Mike Wallace, the dogged, merciless reporter and interviewer who took on politicians, celebrities and other public figures in a 60-year career highlighted by the on-air confrontations that helped make “60 Minutes” the most successful primetime television news program ever, has died. He was 93.

Wallace died Saturday night, CBS spokesman Kevin Tedesco said. READ FULL STORY

Earl Scruggs, bluegrass pioneer, dies at 88

It may be impossible to overstate the importance of bluegrass legend Earl Scruggs to American music. A pioneering banjo player who helped create modern country music, his sound is instantly recognizable and as intrinsically wrapped in the tapestry of the genre as Johnny Cash’s baritone or Hank Williams’ heartbreak.

Scruggs died Wednesday morning at age 88 of natural causes. The legacy he helped build with bandleader Bill Monroe, guitarist Lester Flatt and the rest of the Blue Grass Boys was evident all around Nashville, where he died in an area hospital. His string-bending, mind-blowing way of picking helped transform a regional sound into a national passion.

“It’s not just bluegrass, it’s American music,” bluegrass fan turned country star Dierks Bentley said. “There’s 17- or 18-year-old kids turning on today’s country music and hearing that banjo and they have no idea where that came from. That sound has probably always been there for them and they don’t realize someone invented that three-finger roll style of playing. You hear it everywhere.”  READ FULL STORY

N.J. governor defends flag salute to Whitney Houston

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is strongly defending his decision to have flags lowered to half-staff Saturday for the late singer Whitney Houston amid criticism partly related to her history of substance abuse. Christie says he rejects the idea the New Jersey native “forfeited the good things that she did in her life” because of her substance abuse struggles.

The Republican governor said Wednesday disparaging emails and other messages have been coming into his office. He says critics are wrongly accusing him of treating Houston better than fallen soldiers. He has ordered flags flown at half-staff for all 31 fallen New Jersey soldiers and every fallen police officer during his time in office.

The cause of Houston’s death at a Beverly Hills, Calif., hotel over the weekend hasn’t been determined.

Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls celebrates first graduates

Oprah Winfrey makes no apologies for spending millions on an elite school for underprivileged South African girls. But she’s also looking for ways to make her money stretch further to help more struggling Africans.

Winfrey spoke Friday on the eve of the first graduation at her school. Of the 75 students who started at the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in 2007, 72 will graduate on Saturday.

All are headed to universities in South Africa and the United States to pursue such studies as medicine, law, engineering, and economics.

Across South Africa, more than half a million members of the class of 2011 disappeared before the 496,000 remaining took their final exams. Only a quarter of those who graduated did well enough to qualify for university study.

“We’re taking a victory lap here, for transformation,” Winfrey said. “Every single girl is going to leave here with something greater to offer the world than her body.” READ FULL STORY

Elizabeth Taylor's diamonds fetch record $115 million at auction

Elizabeth Taylor’s jewelry collection fetched a record-setting $115 million — including more than $11.8 million for a pearl necklace and more than $8.8 million for a diamond ring given to her by Richard Burton — at an auction of gems and other memorabilia amassed by the late actress. The 33.19-carat diamond ring given to Taylor by the actor she married twice, sold for $8,818,500. The pearl, diamond and ruby necklace, known as “La Peregrina,” purchased at auction for $37,000 in 1969 by Burton for Taylor reached the world-record price of $11,842,500. It was estimated to sell for $2 million to $3 million. The price surpassed the previous auction record for a pearl, set in 2007 at Christie’s auction house in New York City with the sale of The Baroda Pearls for $7,096,000. READ FULL STORY

'Wizard of Oz' Munchkin Karl Slover dies

Karl Slover, one of the last surviving actors who played Munchkins in the 1939 classic film, The Wizard of Oz, has died. He was 93. The 4-foot-5 Slover died of cardiopulmonary arrest Tuesday afternoon in a central Georgia hospital, said Laurens County Deputy Coroner Nathan Stanley. According to friends, as recently as last weekend, Slover appeared at events in the suburban Chicago area.

Slover was best known for playing the lead trumpeter in the Munchkins’ band but also had roles as a townsman and soldier in the film, said John Fricke, author of 100 Years of Oz and five other books on the movie and its star, Judy Garland. Slover was one of the tiniest male Munchkins in the movie.

Long after Slover retired, he continued to appear around the country at festivals and events related to the movie. He was one of seven Munchkins at the 2007 unveiling of a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame dedicated to the little people in the movie. Only three remain of the 124 diminutive actors who played the beloved Munchkins. READ FULL STORY

Michael Jackson's death bed no longer up for auction

The bed where Michael Jackson died is no longer available for sale. Julien’s Auctions has removed the queen-sized headboard from its auction of items from 100 North Carolwood Drive, Jackson’s last residence. “This item is the only portion of the bed that had been listed for auction, and no part of the bed remains for sale,” company president Darren Julien said Tuesday, adding that he removed the carved headboard seen in evidence photos during the criminal trial of Jackson’s physician from the auction’s lots at the request of Jackson’s estate. READ FULL STORY

Hal Kanter, Emmy-winning writer, has died

Legendary Emmy-winning comedy writer, director, and producer Hal Kanter has passed away at the age of 92 due to complications from pneumonia, according to the Los Angeles Times. Kanter had a career that spanned nearly seven decades and his unparalleled resume included creating the groundbreaking NBC sitcom, Julia, working as a writer and producer on Chico and the Man, and, perhaps most notably, writing the Oscar telecast for nearly 33 years. Two of Kanter’s three Emmys came from his work on the Academy Awards. (His first Emmy was for the variety program The George Gobel Show.)

In addition to the indelible mark he left on television, which also included creating The Jimmy Stewart Show and working briefly as an executive producer on All in the Family, Kanter wrote for the big screen as well. His film credits include writing Road to Bali, Money From Home, Artists and Models, Pocket Full of Miracles, and The Rose Tattoo, which he collaborated on with Tennessee Williams. Kanter stepped behind the camera on occasion, directing the 1957 Elvis Presley drama Loving You, which he also co-wrote.

A recipient of the Writers Guild of America’s Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television, Kanter penned his memoir So Far, So Funny: My Life in Show Business in 1999 and was described by the LA Times as being “the go-to wit to act as master of ceremonies or speak at Hollywood functions and other events.” Carl Reiner echoed the sentiment, telling the Times, “What a dear man. He was considered one of the wits of the industry; there’s no question about it. Any time he was called upon, he always could make the audience laugh.”

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