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Tag: Lawsuits (31-40 of 533)

Tom Cruise settles defamation lawsuit

The publisher of two tabloid magazines said it never intended to imply that Tom Cruise had cut all ties to his daughter after his divorce and announced Friday that it had reached a settlement with the actor over two stories it published.

Bauer Publishing and Cruise’s lawyer wrote in a joint statement that the terms of the settlement were confidential.

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Beastie Boys' 'Girls' sets off copyright fight for viral video

GoldieBlox is a company dedicated to selling sophisticated toys for girls. However, after one of GoldieBlox’s videos featured alternative lyrics to the Beastie Boys song “Girls,” The Hollywood Reporter says the company has filed a lawsuit against Island Def Jam Music Group claiming that “the Beastie Boys have now threatened GoldieBlox with copyright infringement. Lawyers for the Beastie Boys claim that the GoldieBlox Girls Parody Video is a copyright infringement, is not a fair use, and that GoldieBlox’s unauthorized use of the Beastie Boys intellectual property is a ‘big problem’ that has a ‘very significant impact.'”

GoldieBlox is asking for their song to be declared a parody “to clarify the rights of the parties, and to refute the baseless assertion of copyright infringement finally and definitively. Plaintiff seeks a declaratory judgment holding that its parody video does not infringe any copyrights held by Defendants and is protected by the Fair Use Doctrine.”

You can read the complaint here via THR, and watch the video in question below:
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Spike Lee wants Zimmerman tweet lawsuit tossed out

Spike Lee is asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit filed by a Florida couple who say the movie director mistakenly retweeted their address as the home of George Zimmerman.

Lee’s attorneys filed a motion Tuesday to dismiss the lawsuit brought by Elaine and David McClain. Lee’s attorneys argue the lawsuit should be dismissed since the couple reached a $10,000 settlement with Lee last year.

The McClains say Lee tweeted their address instead of the one that belonged to Zimmerman, who was acquitted last summer in Trayvon Martin’s shooting death.

The McClains say they received death threats and had to temporarily move out of their home. Lee’s attorneys say the couple is seeking $1.2 million.

Quincy Jones sues Michael Jackson's estate

Quincy Jones has sued Michael Jackson’s estate, claiming he is owed millions in royalties and production fees on some of the superstar’s greatest hits.

Jones’ lawsuit Friday seeks at least $10 million from the singer’s estate and Sony Music Entertainment, claiming the entities improperly re-edited songs to deprive him of royalties and production fees. The music has been used in the film This Is It and a pair of Cirque du Soleil shows based on the King of Pop’s songs, the lawsuit states.

Jones also claims that he should have received a producer’s credit on the music in This Is It. His lawsuit seeks an accounting of the estate’s profits from the works so that Jones can determine how much he is owed.

The producer worked with Jackson on three of his most popular solo albums, Off the Wall, Thriller, and Bad.

Jackson’s estate wrote in a statement that it was saddened by Jones’ lawsuit. “To the best of its knowledge, Mr. Jones has been appropriately compensated over approximately 35 years for his work with Michael,” the statement said.

An after-hours message left at Sony Music’s New York offices was not immediately returned.

Jackson’s hits “Billie Jean,” “Thriller,” and “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” are among the songs Jones claims were re-edited to deprive him of royalties and his producer’s fee.

Jones’ lawsuit states the producer’s contracts called for him to have the first opportunity to re-edit or alter the songs, in part to protect his reputation.

Sugar Ray band members sue Mark McGrath

Two original members of the rock band Sugar Ray, bass player Matthew Murphy Karges and drummer Charles Stanton Frazier, sued frontman Mark McGrath and guitarist Rodney Sheppard, claiming they smeared them on Twitter and cheated them of money. The court papers allege  breach of fiduciary duty, conversion, unjust enrichment, and other counts.

“Not content to simply misappropriate the Sugar Ray trademark by licensing it to a newly created shell corporation or unlawfully divert an additional 48 percent of the band’s revenues into his own pocket, McGrath spent the last year engaging in a bitter campaign to destroy the personal and professional reputations of Frazier and Karges,” court papers obtained by EW state.

Karges and Frazier also claim that McGrath effectively hijacked the recording of Music for Cougars, the band’s most recent LP. The plaintiffs want their cut of touring revenue and future Sugar Ray money.

Michael Jackson's ex-wife testifies about his fear of pain

Michael Jackson’s ex-wife broke into tears Wednesday when she took the witness stand in a civil case and described the singer’s fear of pain and trust of physicians.

Debbie Rowe said the pop star trusted doctors to prescribe pain medication to him, but they sometimes tried to outdo each other while losing sight of Jackson’s care.

“Michael had a very low pain tolerance and his fear of pain was incredible,” Rowe said. “I think the doctors took advantage of him that way.”

She said she was with Jackson when he received treatments from his longtime dermatologist Dr. Arnold Klein and from plastic surgeon Dr. Steven Hoefflin. The two doctors would try to out-do each other in the pain medications they gave the singer, she said.

The doctors “were going back and forth the whole time, not caring about him,” Rowe told jurors.

Rowe is the mother of the singer’s two oldest children, Prince and Paris Jackson. She and the pop star were married from 1996 to 1999. Rowe also worked with Klein.
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NY court: Marvel can keep Spider-Man, X-Men comics

Spider-Man, Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk can continue to reside in Marvel’s offices after a federal appeals court on Thursday rejected an ownership claim by the children of the artist who helped create them.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan agreed with a lower court judge who denied claims by the family of Jack Kirby, the legendary artist who died in 1994 and whose work spanned more than half a century.

His heirs in California and New York wanted to terminate Marvel’s copyrights from 2014 through 2019 to comics published from 1958 to 1963.

Marvel Worldwide Inc. sued in January 2010 to prevent it, leading U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon in July 2011 to conclude the work was done “for hire,” a legal term that rendered the heirs’ claims invalid.
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Michael Jackson's mom testifies in wrongful-death suit

Michael Jackson’s mother tearfully described finding out about her son’s death Friday and said she expressed concerns about his comeback concert schedule to the promoters of the tour.

Katherine Jackson said she called the CEO of promoter AEG Live LLC to express her view that her son could have done 50 shows, but not if they were spaced closely together.

“He couldn’t do every other night like AEG wanted him to do at first,” Katherine Jackson said.

She said she called AEG Live CEO Randy Phillips and her son’s manager, Tohme Tohme, to express her concerns about the This Is It schedule.

She didn’t describe any additional details about the calls. Katherine Jackson is expected to be the final plaintiff’s witness in her case against AEG Live, which has lasted 12 weeks. The defense case is scheduled to begin next week.
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Lawsuit over 'Midnight in Paris' Faulkner quote dismissed

In the case of the lawsuit between Sony Pictures Classics and Faulkner Literary Rights, the past may be dead after all. Yesterday, a judge dismissed the case, which had claimed that Woody Allen’s 2011 movie, Midnight in Paris, had infringed on a copyright by quoting from William Faulkner’s novel Requiem for a Nun.

In the movie, Owen Wilson’s character says: “The past is not dead. Actually, it’s not even past. You know who said that? Faulkner. And he was right. And I met him, too. I ran into him at a dinner party.” Faulkner Literary Rights argued that the use of the line from the 1950 novel was unauthorized. The original passage from the book reads, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”

In his opinion, Chief Judge Michael P. Mills of the United States District Court in Mississippi stated that the rights-holders provided limited facts in the complaint beyond descriptions of Requiem for a Nun and Midnight in Paris, and that the court concludes that “no substantial similarity exists between the copyrighted work and the allegedly infringing work.”

In determining the final opinion, Mills both viewed the film and read Faulkner’s original novel. His memorandum opinion reads that the court “is thankful that the parties did not ask the court to compare The Sound and the Fury with Sharknado.”

Judge says Pixar and Lucasfilm settled suit

A court document says Lucasfilm and Pixar have settled a lawsuit that claims they and other giant companies conspired to keep wages down by agreeing not to poach each other’s workers.

In a Sunday filing, U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh says lawyers representing the workers had notified her about the settlement with Lucasfilm and Pixar. Terms of the settlement weren’t disclosed.

The San Jose lawsuit still continues against Apple Inc., Google Inc., Intel Corp., Intuit Inc. and Adobe Systems Inc.

It contends they schemed to cheat employees by artificially suppressing the demand for their services. A status report on efforts to settle the case is supposed to be filed by Friday.
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