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Tag: Lawsuits (1-10 of 534)

Twentieth Century Fox sued over 'Simpsons' hologram used at Comic-Con

Hologram USA, along with Musion Das Hologram Limited and Uwe Maass, are suing Twentieth Century Fox and Gracie Films for willful infringement in regards to a Homer Simpson hologram that was used at Comic-Con in July.

According to the lawsuit filed Thursday, “Defendants do not possess a valid license to practice that technology. Such a license may only be provided by Plaintiffs. In spite of their knowledge of Plaintiffs’ rights, the Performance was made anyway.”

The activity in question is the Simpsons Comic-Con panel, during which a hologram of Homer came out onto the stage for a discussion with the show’s creator, Matt Groening, among others. You can watch it below.

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Adele's son wins five-figure settlement from paparazzi

Even when Adele isn’t on stage, she’s still winning.

According to the Associated Press, Adele’s one-year-old son, Angelo, won a five-figure sum in damages from a settlement with photo agency Corbis Images UK after paparazzi photographed him in private family moments.

Adele’s lawyer Jenny Afia told the AP that the singer refused to let her son become “public property.” “It is a matter of profound sadness that many of his milestone moments, such as his first family outing and his first trip to playgroup, were photographed and published worldwide expressly against his family’s wishes,” Afia added.

As for the money, it will be held in a trust for Angelo, and Corbis Images UK has agreed to stop using the photos.

Judge says John Travolta can't stop alleged gay lover from spilling secrets

A California appeals court judge made a ruling on Tuesday that said actor John Travolta can no longer prevent former employee and alleged former gay lover Douglas Gotterba from telling his side of the story in court.

Gotterba worked for Travolta’s aircraft company Alto in the 1980s, until he reached a written termination agreement with the business in 1987. The pilot claims that his six-year working relationship with Travolta developed into something much more personal, and nearly 25 years later, he decided to “tell the story of his life and those involved in it.”

After Gotterba gave an interview to The National Enquirer and announced plans to release a book, Travolta’s attorney sent the pilot cease-and-desist letters claiming Gotterba was breaching a confidentiality provision in his original termination agreement. But Gotterba and his lawyer called the documents inauthentic, saying the paperwork in question was an early draft of the agreement. Gotterba sued Travolta and Alto, seeking a judge’s opinion about which agreement was valid and whether or not confidentiality was really enforceable.

However, a special California law created to protect First Amendment rights continued the legal back and forth—Alto responded with an anti-SLAPP motion asserting Travolta’s right to petition and further questioned whether or not Gotteba’s lawsuit was based upon the cease-and-desist letters alone, or the larger confidentiality disagreement. On Tuesday, California appeals court Presiding Justice Arthur Gilbert ruled in Gotteba’s favor, stating that the lawsuit was based on “the validity of the asserted termination agreements.” According to court documents, Gilbert added, “Although the prelitigation letters may have triggered Gotterba’s complaint and may be evidence in support of the complaint, they are not the basis of the complaint.”

Gilbert concluded that if Travolta had won, the decision “would lead to the absurd result that a person receiving a demand letter threatening legal action for breach of contract would be precluded from seeking declaratory relief to determine the validity of the contract. Declaratory relief would be limited to situations where the parties have not communicated their disagreement.”

Conor Oberst drops libel lawsuit against rape accuser

Conor Oberst, musician and Bright Eyes frontman, has dropped the libel lawsuit he filed against rape accuser Joanie Faircloth.

In 2013, Faircloth took to the xoJane comments section to claim that Oberst raped her when she was 16. Her claim quickly spread across the internet, and she later wrote a Tumblr further detailing the supposed encounter. Although both the comments and the Tumblr post were deleted, Oberst said that the claims damaged his reputation and career, leading him to file a libel lawsuit against Faircloth.

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Tracy Morgan released from rehabilitation center

30 Rock star Tracy Morgan was released today from a rehabilitation center to finish his physical recovery at home, according to Reuters. His publicist Lewis Kay confirmed this, releasing a statement saying that “Tracy has been released from the rehabilitation center and will continue his recovery efforts at home with an aggressive outpatient program.  He asked me to pass along his sincerest gratitude to everyone who has helped him get to this point. He would also appreciate some privacy during this crucial point in his recovery.” Morgan was critically injured in a car crash near Cranbury, N.J., on June 7 when a Walmart truck hit the rear of a Mercedes limo bus carrying the comedian. Morgan sustained multiple injuries, including a broken leg, while another comedian, James McNair, was killed in the incident. In July, the driver of the Walmart truck, Kevin Roper, pleaded not guilty to criminal charges that include vehicular homicide and assault by auto. On Thursday, lawyers acting for Morgan sued Walmart, according to CNN.

Lindsay Lohan sues Rockstar Games over 'Grand Theft Auto V'

Last December, Forbes reported that Lindsay Lohan spoke with her lawyers about the inclusion of a character with her likeness in Grand Theft Auto V. On Wednesday, Forbes reports that the actress has filed suit against Take-Two Interactive and subsidiary publisher and developer Rockstar Games, maker of the blockbuster videogame.

The suit claims that the character Lacey Jonas is an “unequivocal” reference to Lohan, citing the use of her likeness, clothing line, and the Chateau Marmont hotel where she used to live.

For more on the suit, see the Forbes story here.

Ex-'Scandal' actor Columbus Short faces lawsuit after restaurant fight

Columbus Short, who played Harrison Wright on ABC’s Scandal for its first three seasons, was sued on Monday by Felton Hyche III—the man he allegedly assaulted outside of a restaurant on March 15—for battery, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and negligence.

According to the seven-page complaint filed in the Los Angeles County Superior Court on Monday, Hyche alleges that the former Scandal star attacked him outside of Gabe’s Bar and Grill in California. The two men were at a bar to celebrate Hyche’s sister’s engagement.

Hyche claims that the 31-year-old actor attacked him following an argument that took place outside of the restaurant. Short’s “unwarranted and cowardly ‘sucker punch,'” as the suit describes it, allegedly knocked Hyche unconscious and caused him to fall to the ground and hit his head on the concrete. According to the suit, Short fled the scene before Hyche was rushed to the hospital. Hyche claims he suffered a major fracture to his cheek and orbital bones.

Hyche also claims that he continues to endure “ridicule from strangers as the man who was knocked out by Columbus Short,” and thus is seeking punitive and exemplary damages in the amount of $1 million for both the battery charge and the infliction of emotional distress.

On May 15, Short appeared in court and pleaded not guilty to felony battery charges. If convicted, Short faces up to four years in jail.

Short is currently also dealing with a misdemeanor spousal battery case for allegedly threatening to kill his wife, who filed for divorce and a restraining order following the incident.

In April, Short confirmed that he will not be returning four Scandal‘s fourth season.

 

Bryan Singer files motion to dismiss sex abuse charges

X-Men director Bryan Singer has denied allegations of teen sexual abuse and filed a motion to dismiss recent charges, based on the plaintiff’s own sworn statements.

In a civil lawsuit last month, Michael Egan III accused Singer and three other men of sexually abusing him at lurid parties in California and Hawaii when he was only 17 years old. But in his deposition from a similar 2000 case against three different defendants, Egan claimed to never have taken “any trips outside the continental U.S.” — and when asked then if he had been abused by anyone other than the three initial defendants, he answered negatively. Singer has repeatedly denied the charges and claims to have phone records and receipts that prove he was not in Hawaii when Egan claims the assaults took place. In Singer’s filing, which can be read at the Hollywood Reporter, he asks for dismissal based on the Hawaii court’s lack of jurisdiction.

Last month, Egan had filed charges in Hawaii against Singer, David Neuman, Garth Ancier, and Gary Goddard. Last week, Neuman filed a similar motion to dismiss, based on the same evidence and including Egan’s decade-old testimony that Neuman had “never acted improperly.” Egan’s attorney has not yet responded to his client’s inconsistencies, other than to reiterate his current claim that he was in Hawaii with the defendants. Neuman’s motion already has a court date set for July 28.

Taylor Swift sued by Lucky 13 clothing company for trademark infringement

Taylor Swift didn’t know that her lucky number was going to be such trouble. The Grammy winner is being sued by Orange County clothing company Lucky 13 for trademark infringement, according to E!. The company alleges the singer used its federally registered trademarks (a.k.a, the phrase “Lucky 13″) without authorization.

According to the court documents in the report, Lucky 13 owner Robert Kloetzly said his company, which was founded in 1991, has tried to contact Swift and her camp on multiple occasions in advance of the lawsuit and cited that Swift is confusing the marketplace because they have similar target demographics. Not sure if Kloetzly actually knows who Swift’s main audience is, though, as he describes the “Red” artist as a tatted up singer who likes “fast cars and dangerous men who drive them inappropriately”. He claims Swift’s music video for “I Knew You Were Trouble” could easily be mistaken as an ad for Lucky 13 because it “depicts stylish, attractive, tattooed individuals in provocative situations.”

Kloetzly is seeking all the profits that Swift has made or the damages to his company, whichever is more, and for Swift’s online store to be shut down.

Supreme Court revives 'Raging Bull' lawsuit

Five years ago in 2009, Paula Petrella sued MGM over continuing commercial use of 1980’s Raging Bull, a film that her father Frank Petrella wrote the screenplay for. A federal judge and the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Petrella could have filed the lawsuit long before 2009 and therefore had waited too long, but the Supreme Court has now reversed that ruling.

Now, Petrella can revive the lawsuit and potentially receive royalties from MGM. Head over to the Associated Press for the full story.

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