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Tag: Books (1-6 of 6)

Author Sue Townsend, creator of Adrian Mole, dies at 68

British comic author Sue Townsend, who created angst-ridden teenage diarist Adrian Mole and sent Queen Elizabeth II into exile on a public housing estate, has died after suffering a stroke. She was 68.

Her publisher, Penguin Books said Friday that Townsend died in Leicester, central England, a day earlier.

Townsend left school at 15, married at 18, and by 23 was a single mother of three. She worked in a factory, in shops and at other jobs — and wrote, honing her style for years before breaking through into publication.

Her first novel, The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4, was published in 1982 and was hailed as a comic masterpiece. Written in the voice of a gauche but observant teenager, it fused the acute awkwardness of adolescence with the zeitgeist of Thatcher-era Britain. READ FULL STORY

Peter Matthiessen, writer and naturalist, dies at 86

Peter Matthiessen, a rich man’s son who spurned a life of leisure and embarked on extraordinary physical and spiritual quests while producing such acclaimed books as The Snow Leopard and At Play in the Fields of the Lord, died Saturday. He was 86.

His publisher Geoff Kloske of Riverhead Books said Matthiessen, who had been diagnosed with leukemia, was ill “for some months.” He died at a hospital near his home on Long Island.

“Peter was a force of nature, relentlessly curious, persistent, demanding — of himself and others,” his literary agent, Neil Olson, said in a statement. “But he was also funny, deeply wise, and compassionate.”

Few authors could claim such a wide range of achievements. Matthiessen helped found The Paris Review, one of the most influential literary magazines, and won National Book Awards for The Snow Leopard, his spiritual account of the Himalayas, and for the novel Shadow Country. A leading environmentalist and wilderness writer, he embraced the best and worst that nature could bring him, whether trekking across the Himalayas, parrying sharks in Australia or enduring a hurricane in Antarctica. READ FULL STORY

Best-selling author Vince Flynn dies at age 47

Best-selling author Vince Flynn, who wrote the Mitch Rapp counterterrorism thriller series and sold more than 15 million books in the U.S. alone, died Wednesday in Minnesota after a more than two-year battle with prostate cancer, according to friends and his publisher. He was 47.

Flynn was supporting himself by bartending when he self-published his first novel, Term Limits, in 1997 after getting more than 60 rejection letters. After it became a local best-seller, Picket Books, a Simon & Schuster imprint, signed him to a two-book deal — and Term Limits became a New York Times best-seller in paperback.

The St. Paul-based author also sold millions of books in the international market and averaged about a book a year, most of them focused on Rapp, a CIA counterterrorism operative. His 14th novel, The Last Man, was published last year.
READ FULL STORY

Joan Rivers can't get arrested

Police were called to a Costco store in a Los Angeles suburb after comedian Joan Rivers handcuffed herself to a shopping cart to protest the store, which is not selling her latest book.

The 79-year-old Fashion Police host was being filmed by a camera crew Tuesday as she complained that the store in Burbank, Calif., had refused to carry her book, I Hate Everything… Starting With Me.

Burbank city spokesman Drew Sugars says the store manager called police, who sent officers to the scene because they were uncertain of the scale of the situation. They ended up escorting Rivers from the store, and she and her crew left without incident.

Sugars says there were no citations or arrests.

Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes dead

Author Carlos Fuentes, who played a dominant role in Latin America’s novel-writing boom by delving into the failed ideals of the Mexican revolution, died Tuesday in a Mexico City hospital. He was 83.

Fuentes died at the Angeles del Pedregal hospital where he was taken after his personal doctor, Arturo Ballesteros, found him in shock in his Mexico City home. Ballesteros told reporters outside the hospital that the writer had a sudden internal hemorrhage that caused him to lose consciousness.

The loss was mourned worldwide via Twitter and across Mexican airwaves by everyone from fellow Mexican authors Elena Poniatowska and Jorge Volpi to reggaeton artist Rene Perez of the group Calle 13. “I deeply lament the death of our beloved and admired Carlos Fuentes, a universal Mexican writer,” said President Felipe Calderon on his Twitter account. READ FULL STORY

Dartmouth names medical school after Dr. Seuss

Dartmouth College has named its medical school after a famous alum: Theodor “Ted” Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. Dartmouth said Wednesday that Geisel and his wife, Audrey, have been the most significant philanthropists in its history. The school is being named the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine.

President Jim Yong Kim said Geisel, a 1925 graduate, lived out the Dartmouth ethos of thinking differently and creatively to illuminate the world’s challenges, and the opportunities for understanding and surmounting them. Audrey Geisel, who has a background as a nurse, said her husband would be proud to have his name forever connected to the school.

Geisel, who died in 1991, penned The Cat in the Hat, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, among many other children’s classics.

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