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Category: Movies (1-10 of 644)

Shia LaBeouf is seeking voluntary treatment for alcohol addiction

Days after he was expelled from a Broadway performance of Cabaret and arrested for disorderly conduct and criminal trespass, Shia LaBeouf is receiving voluntary treatment for alcohol abuse.

On June 26, the 28-year-old actor was handcuffed and escorted out of Manhattan’s Studio 54 during the show’s first act after he allegedly disrupted the performance by yelling at the actors and smoking. He was released from jail the next day.

Photographers keeping tabs on LaBeouf in the aftermath captured him carrying Alcoholics Anonymous literature, and his publicist recently released the following statement:

“Contrary to previous erroneous reports, Shia LaBeouf has not checked into a rehabilitation facility but he is voluntarily receiving treatment for alcohol addiction.

“He understands that these recent actions are a symptom of a larger health problem and he has taken the first of many necessary steps towards recovery.”

Brad Pitt files protective order against alleged red carpet attacker

Vitalii Sediuk got a bit too close to Brad Pitt at Wednesday’s premiere of Maleficent – and now, he’s suffering the consequences: a temporary restraining order barring him from being near the actor.

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Bryan Singer files motion to dismiss sex abuse charges

X-Men director Bryan Singer has denied allegations of teen sexual abuse and filed a motion to dismiss recent charges, based on the plaintiff’s own sworn statements.

In a civil lawsuit last month, Michael Egan III accused Singer and three other men of sexually abusing him at lurid parties in California and Hawaii when he was only 17 years old. But in his deposition from a similar 2000 case against three different defendants, Egan claimed to never have taken “any trips outside the continental U.S.” — and when asked then if he had been abused by anyone other than the three initial defendants, he answered negatively. Singer has repeatedly denied the charges and claims to have phone records and receipts that prove he was not in Hawaii when Egan claims the assaults took place. In Singer’s filing, which can be read at the Hollywood Reporter, he asks for dismissal based on the Hawaii court’s lack of jurisdiction.

Last month, Egan had filed charges in Hawaii against Singer, David Neuman, Garth Ancier, and Gary Goddard. Last week, Neuman filed a similar motion to dismiss, based on the same evidence and including Egan’s decade-old testimony that Neuman had “never acted improperly.” Egan’s attorney has not yet responded to his client’s inconsistencies, other than to reiterate his current claim that he was in Hawaii with the defendants. Neuman’s motion already has a court date set for July 28.

Cinematographer Gordon Willis, known for 'Godfather' and Woody Allen films, dies at 82

Gordon Willis, the cinematographer and director of photography best known for his shadowy work in the Godfather series and a slew of Woody Allen’s best-known films — including Annie Hall and Manhattan – has died. He was 82.

“This is a momentous loss,” American Society of Cinematographers president Richard Crudo told Deadline late Sunday night, confirming Willis’s passing. “He was one of the giants who absolutely changed the way movies looked. Up until the time of The Godfather 1 and 2, nothing previously shot looked that way. He changed the way films looked and the way people looked at films.”

We’ll be posting a full obituary later in the day. In the meantime, watch Willis discussing his unique style in this video interview from 2013:

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Bryan Singer faces second lawsuit for sexual assault

X-Men director Bryan Singer was hit with another sexual assault lawsuit, filed by Jeff Herman, the same lawyer representing the man who made similar claims in April. A British “John Doe” accuses Singer and Broadway producer Gary Goddard (Jekyll & Hyde) of sexual assault when he was still a teenager. Singer, who’s denied all charges, says he is the victim of a “sick, twisted shakedown,” but the accusations have cast an uncomfortable pall over the release of X-Men: Days of Future Past, which opens May 23.

According to the Daily Beast, the new lawsuit claims that Goddard met the Plaintiff on the Internet when he was only 14. The online relationship included the exchange of nude photos and explicit videos, and when Goddard and Singer visited London for the Superman Returns premiere, he claims a sexual assault took place at an after-party. READ FULL STORY

Movie trailer voice Hal Douglas dies at 89

Hal Douglas, known by his voice-over work in movie trailers, died Friday at age 89 from complications of pancreatic cancer, according to The New York Times.

Douglas voiced trailers for movies ranging from the classic drama Forrest Gump to the silly Meet the Parents and worked up until just about two years ago. He was one of the movie industry’s number one choices for voice-overs, and was able to make his living in New York — his preferred city — instead of  Hollywood.

He died in his Lovettsville, Va., home.

Christian Bale and wife expecting second child

Christian Bale and wife Sandra “Sibi” Bale are having another baby!

The very private couple is expecting their second child, People reports.

The 40-year-old American Hustle star and his wife, 43, have been married for 14 years and are already parents to an 8-year-old daughter.

'Nymphomaniac' film is banned in Turkey

Turkey’s film board has banned the screening of director Lars von Trier’s movie Nymphomaniac Volume 1 at cinemas in the country because of the film’s sex scenes.

Cem Erkul, who heads the Cinema General Directorate, said Wednesday the eight-member board voted 6-2 this week that the film is “pushing the boundaries of porn” and unfit for public viewing.

The film was due to be released this month.

Erkul said it decided against censoring the sex scenes from the movie because there were too many to cut out.

Its distributor can appeal the ruling in court, but the decision does not affect the film’s screening at the Istanbul Film Festival next month.

The two-part film is a drama about a woman’s erotic journey from birth to the age of 50.

French filmmaker Alain Resnais dies at 91

Alain Resnais, the seminal French filmmaker whose cryptic Last Year at Marianbad extended its influence across generations, has died.

He was 91, and was editing drafts of his next project from his hospital bed, according to producer Jean-Louis Livi, who was working on the film with him.

Resnais, who died Saturday, was renowned for reinventing himself during each of his full-length films, which included the acclaimed Hiroshima Mon Amour in 1959 and most recently Life of Riley, which was honored at the Berlin Film Festival just weeks ago.

“He was a man of the highest quality, a genius,” Livi told France Info radio on Sunday, confirming Resnais’ death with “enormous sadness, accompanied by enormous pride.” READ FULL STORY

YouTube ordered to take down anti-Muslim film

A U.S. appeals court ordered YouTube on Wednesday to take down an anti-Muslim film that sparked violent riots in parts of the Middle East and death threats to the actors.

The decision by a divided three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reinstated a lawsuit filed against YouTube by an actress who appeared briefly in the 2012 video that led to rioting and deaths because of its negative portrayal of the Prophet Muhammad.

YouTube resisted calls by President Barack Obama and other world leaders to take down the video, arguing that to do so amounted to unwarranted government censorship and would violate the Google-owned company’s free speech protections. Besides, the company argued that the filmmakers and not the actors of Innocence of Muslims owned the copyright and only they could remove it from YouTube.

And typically, that’s the case with the vast majority of clips posted on YouTube — and Hollywood in general — that don’t violate decency laws and policies. But the 9th Circuit said Wednesday that this case was far from typical and that the actress, Cindy Lee Garcia, retained a copyright claim that YouTube must respect. That’s because she believed she was acting in a different production than the one that ultimately appeared online.

“Had Ms. Garcia known the true nature of the propaganda film the producers were planning, she would never had agreed to appear in the movie,” said Cris Armenta, Garcia’s attorney.

Google argues that the actress had no claim to the film because filmmaker Mark Basseley Youssef wrote the dialogue, managed the entire production and dubbed over Garcia’s dialogue during postproduction editing.

Writing for the court, Chief Judge Alex Kozinski said the ruling was not a blanket order giving copyright protection to every actor, but that in this case, Garcia’s performance was worthy of copyright protection.

“We need not and do not decide whether every actor has a copyright in his performance within a movie,” the judge wrote. “It suffices for now to hold that, while the matter is fairly debatable, Garcia is likely to prevail.”

Judge N. Randy Smith dissented, arguing that Garcia’s five-second appearance gave her no ownership claims.

“Her brief appearance in the film, even if a valuable contribution to the film, does not make her an author,” Smith wrote. “Indeed, it is difficult to understand how she can be considered an ‘inventive or master mind’ of her performance under these facts.”

Youssef, the filmmaker, was sentenced to 21 months in prison for check fraud in 2010 and barred from accessing the Internet without court approval. He was returned to prison in 2012 for violating terms of his probation and was released on probation in September 2013.

Garcia was paid $500 to appear for five seconds in a film she was told was called Desert Warrior that she thought had nothing to do with religion or radical Islam. When the clip was released, her lines were dubbed to have her character asking Muhammad if he was a child molester.

“This is a troubling case,” Kozinski wrote. “Garcia was duped into providing an artistic performance that was used in a way she never could have foreseen. Her unwitting and unwilling inclusion in Innocence of Muslims led to serious threats against her life. It’s disappointing, though perhaps not surprising, that Garcia needed to sue in order to protect herself and her rights.”

For Google, the ruling represents a nettlesome issue if allowed to stand. The company fears that bit players and extras appearing in popular clips will now be emboldened to send takedown notices to YouTube unless settlements can be reached with the filmmakers.

Google Inc., which has removed the clip, said it will appeal the decision to a special 11-judge panel of the appeals court. The next move after that would be to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case.

“We strongly disagree with this ruling and will fight it,” said Google spokeswoman Abbi Tatton.

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